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Poster: jerlouvis Date: Jun 6, 2011 9:08am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Butch Trucks Quote (Dead-Related)

Honestly Duckpond I have never heard the 45 rpm single of Dark Star since I have no interest at all in the bands studio efforts,but since you bring it up I would assume it has either some banjo or banjo influenced playing on it.I would explain that by saying that version has some banjo or banjo influenced playing on it as opposed to the majority which doesn't.My point was the improvisational music was less influenced by country/bluegrass roots than other styles,if you hear it differently than so be it.

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Poster: duckpond74 Date: Jun 6, 2011 11:23am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Butch Trucks Quote (Dead-Related)

"My point was the improvisational music was less influenced by country/bluegrass roots than other styles,if you hear it differently than so be it."

I get your point jerlouvis, and I'll agree that we all can hear things differently . . . but, your having not heard that strange and silly 2:44 Dark Star single, let my tongue-in-cheek response to your banjo comment - specifically with you mentioning Earl Scruggs - fall flat. To let you know, after a quick paced, jaunty '68 style Dark Star that features chorused vocals, sitar-like sounds, a brief acoustic guitar bit - and no improvisation whatsoever - the tune ends with Jerry reciting prose while playing a short, brisk, and a very strong Earl Scruggs style banjo bit. . . . I actually responded, 'cuz I thought your Scruggs / banjo comment was alluding to the single. Some time when you have 3 minutes to spare and want to see why a Dark Star / Earl Scruggs relationship does indeed exist, check it out. I know of one musician who took up banjo and has made a comfortable living all because he was so taken with that bit on the single. . . . funny old world.

Along these lines, I've always felt that what many folks call the 'Mind Left Body Jam' was bluegrass and banjo influenced. Your thoughts or comments would be welcome.

And, by the way, I agree with much of what both you and Butch Trucks have stated . . . we all hear it differently.

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Poster: jerlouvis Date: Jun 6, 2011 4:41pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Butch Trucks Quote (Dead-Related)

After reading the description of that Dark Star in your response DP,somewhere in the recesses of my crispy brainpan I do recall hearing that version some many years ago and now better understand your original post.As for the bluegrass/banjo influence I find that it filters it's way into the music more in the way Jerry plays his guitar with a banjo technique than a strong country/bluegrass/banjo resultant sound during the jams.

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Poster: light into ashes Date: Jun 6, 2011 6:15pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Butch Trucks Quote (Dead-Related)

"What many folks call the 'Mind Left Body Jam' was bluegrass and banjo influenced."

I doubt this. I think it may sound this way cause Jerry's fingerpicking the chords sometimes - and on 9/21/72 it does come out of that bluegrassy jam, kind of like a cross with the Goin' Down the Road intro. But fingerpicking arpeggios doesn't necessarily mean Jerry's channeling the banjo....any more than his using the slide in the Mind Left Body jam means it was influenced by blues slide playing! It was kind of a combination of everything....
Actually I hear more of a bluegrassy element the way Jerry plays that extended outro to Playing in the Band they'd do in '74!

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